How to Fly Your Pets to Ecuador

How to Fly Your Pets to Ecuador

So you've decided to move to Ecuador. You’ve done your research and know just the town to begin your adventure. You’ve got your documents sorted for getting a residence visa. You’ve even gone through the house and decided what will go with you and what will stay or be sold. But what about your beloved family pet? Just how do you bring Fido or Kitty into Ecuador from the United States or Canada? This is a concern for many aspiring expats. As it turns out, it’s really not all that difficult.

Vilcabamba: Now is the Time to Buy in Ecuador’s Sacred Valley

Vilcabamba: Now is the Time to Buy in Ecuador’s Sacred Valley

It’s been called the Sacred Valley, the Valley of Longevity, and the Valley of Eternal Youth. Tucked into the heart of Ecuador’s southern Andes, the little town of Vilcabamba has earned those monikers, and it’s easy to see why. Steep rounded mountains rise from all directions, giving the town a feel of seclusion and protection. The rich black soil turns out hundreds of varieties of edible plants. And warm weather year-round makes the place a permanent paradise. In fact, when the Ecuadorian tourism bureau decided to market the country as “The Land of Eternal Spring,” I’m convinced it had Vilcabamba in mind. With temperature highs averaging between 74 F and 79 F and lows never dropping below the mid-50s F, it’s tough for me to imagine a more ideal climate.

Bringing Beer to Locals in Loja, Ecuador

Bringing Beer to Locals in Loja, Ecuador

Ecuador attracts people from all over the world for many reasons. The natural beauty, colorful culture, great climate, and affordable cost of living are just some of the pulls. Beer, however, has never been one of the country’s strongest selling points. And this is something that U.S. expat Greg Gedeon is trying to address with his microbrewery, Zarza—coupled with the beer and bar of the same name—taking the mountain town of Loja by storm. Texan Greg first came to Ecuador nine years ago, fresh out of acupuncture school and looking to ply his trade in Latin America. Attracted by Loja’s nice weather, friendly people, and colonial architecture, he settled down in the area and stayed for two-and-a-half years. “When I first moved here, I was desperate for a decent beer,” Greg says. “So I started learning to brew my own beer.”

The Benefits of Adopting a New Culture

The Benefits of Adopting a New Culture

Lower costs, less stress, better weather, new adventures…all the expats I meet have their reasons for moving to Ecuador. In my little mountain town of Cotacachi, I’m loving the lower cost of living—my husband David and I and our two sons live here for $1,400 a month, including rent—which in turn allows me to work only part-time. That, of course, leads to more time with my family, which creates a happier environment at home. This nice little chain reaction ultimately creates a relaxed overall atmosphere that is great for my health.

Low-Cost and Personal: The Pleasant Truth about Health Care in Ecuador

Low-Cost and Personal: The Pleasant Truth about Health Care in Ecuador

Each morning Tennessee natives Bobby and Becca Vines are greeted by views of two stunning volcanoes. Small-town life in Cotacachi, Ecuador, is never dull, and the couple spends their days viewing international films, enjoying live music, and visiting with the locals. Bobby and Becca spent much of their lives devoted to educating Tennessee schoolchildren. But as retirement neared, the couple knew their teachers’ pensions wouldn’t be enough to allow them to continue living comfortably just outside Nashville.

Pirates and the World’s Best Snorkeling on the Caribbean’s Forgotten Island

Pirates and the World’s Best Snorkeling on the Caribbean’s Forgotten Island

I’m standing on a floating footbridge over a piratedug canal once used as a secret ship hideaway. To my right lies the tiny island of Santa Catalina, birthed when the creation of Canal Aury separated it from the main island, where centuries-old cannons still stand watch atop a high bluff. To my left is the sleepy town of Santa Isabel, administrative center of Isla Providencia. Other Caribbean islands may be soaked in pirate lore, but Providencia is drenched in it. More than one buccaneer made this his base, perhaps the most notorious of whom was Captain Henry Morgan. Today he is most famous for the rum that bears his name, but in his time Captain Morgan made a name for himself by attacking Spanish strongholds.

A Canadian-Themed Bar in the Andes

A Canadian-Themed Bar in the Andes

At 7,300 feet and home to cobbled streets and majestic colonial buildings the small Ecuadorian city of Ibarra is not a big expat haven. But along with a year-round moderate climate it harbors opportunities nonetheless…as Canadian Enderick Spurette has found. Bordered by the majestic Andes Mountains the bustle of city life is balanced by that of surrounding farms and historic hillside haciendas. Ibarra is a place where the banking district sits opposite small craft stores and mom and pop setups, and where those with a bit of motivation and desire can still find a business niche—just like Enderick’s Caribou Bar and Grill.

Spotting an Accomodation Gap and Filling it in an Ecuadorian Jungle Town

Spotting an Accomodation Gap and Filling it in an Ecuadorian Jungle Town

Ten years ago while stationed as a volunteer nurse in Archidona, a small community not far from Tena in Ecuador’s jungled east, Michelle Klein found the accommodations to be lacking. “I rented a room for $50 a month. But there were up to nine people at times competing for the bathroom, the shower didn’t have hot water, and the windows didn’t have screens. It was dark. And there really wasn’t any other good place to stay,” she says. It was easy to spot the gap in the market.

The Simple Pleasures of a Stress-Free Life

The Simple Pleasures of a Stress-Free Life

I’ve just returned to Ecuador from a two week spell in the U.S. and I’m still processing the experience. It was fabulous to see family again and connect with co-workers, but my time there was not quite as I expected. This was my first time back in three years and prior to my trip I kept thinking to myself that I was “going home.” But as it turns out I wasn’t as at home back in my mother country as I had imagined.